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relay for 16v
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DRR S/Pro
Picture of Lenny5160
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quote:
Originally posted by Triple Nickel:
Curly is right, a relay is designed to deliver higher CURRENT to the device you are trying to supply power to. It enables much smaller wires to be used for the triggering device (button in this case), yet still deliver high CURRENT and thus more power to the device.


The relay delivers higher current...than what?

If you use switches rated for high current, you can achieve any level of current you want without relays. Your second sentence is correct; relays allow the switch to control a high-current circuit while using smaller wires/lower current through the switch itself.

But the relay will only deliver whatever voltage/current is supplied to the input. It isn't some magical device that increases voltage/current.

To keep this somewhat on-topic, a relay isn't going to do anything in this situation unless the relay is fed with a 12 volt source. I also don't think I'd want to introduce an additional variable (another relay opening/closing) into my transbrake circuit of all things.


Tony Leonard
 
Posts: 3179 | Location: Inver Grove Heights, MN | Registered: March 18, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
DRR Sportsman
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For what its worth.... we are splitting hairs here.

Relays are used to deliver HIGHER current than the switching wires/buttons that are used to power a specific electric device. That was the point and looks like we agree on that. My intent in the first statement was to imply that switching device/wires are typically small and when there's a need for higher amperage a relay is used. The second sentence was a clarifying statement to support the first sentence. I did not intend to imply that Amperage would be created out of thin air just by using a relay, only that a relay would deliver more than the smaller trigger/switch wires if there was a need. I'll work to clarify that in the future if it helps.

I never stated VOLTAGE would change. My comments were in reference to AMPERAGE with an assumption that the OP thought this was an amperage issue. Voltage doesn't change unless there's a load supplied and the power source (battery, wire, switch, etc) can't maintain that load, in this case something will change. In the case of a small wire/switch it will burn wires/switch and or fuses if equipped with them. If the wires are adequate and the battery can't support the load, the voltage will sag, but power consumed will remain constant. I could go on with Ohms law equations if you'd like.....
 
Posts: 404 | Location: Pride, La | Registered: April 18, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
DRR S/Pro
Picture of Lenny5160
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Triple Nickel:
For what its worth.... we are splitting hairs here.

Relays are used to deliver HIGHER current than the switching wires/buttons that are used to power a specific electric device. That was the point and looks like we agree on that. My intent in the first statement was to imply that switching device/wires are typically small and when there's a need for higher amperage a relay is used. The second sentence was a clarifying statement to support the first sentence. I did not intend to imply that Amperage would be created out of thin air just by using a relay, only that a relay would deliver more than the smaller trigger/switch wires if there was a need. I'll work to clarify that in the future if it helps.

I never stated VOLTAGE would change. My comments were in reference to AMPERAGE with an assumption that the OP thought this was an amperage issue. Voltage doesn't change unless there's a load supplied and the power source (battery, wire, switch, etc) can't maintain that load, in this case something will change. In the case of a small wire/switch it will burn wires/switch and or fuses if equipped with them. If the wires are adequate and the battery can't support the load, the voltage will sag, but power consumed will remain constant. I could go on with Ohms law equations if you'd like.....


I really just wanted to address Curly's post essentially stating that adding a relay would burn the solenoid up faster because relays supply more power. That COULD be true, but it's all dependent on what you hook up to the supply side of the relay.

You could have 16v powering your switch panel, and use a 16v wire to control a relay which powers a 12v circuit.


Tony Leonard
 
Posts: 3179 | Location: Inver Grove Heights, MN | Registered: March 18, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
DRR Top Comp
Picture of wideopen231
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Like I said relay may be wrong wording. I should have stated resistor or similar. Just figured an understood thing. Posting what was stated to me and me knowing what he meant assumed everyone else doing same . My bad.




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Posts: 4279 | Location: Greensboro NC | Registered: May 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
DRR Pro
Picture of CURTIS REED
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How about saying that relays carry a higher “load” allowing smaller trigger wires and switch?



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Posts: 2999 | Location: KIEFER, OK. | Registered: August 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
DRR Top Comp
Picture of wideopen231
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Question and I know totally stupid question to ask. I have been told.

Anyway using the weatherpack connection would cause a voltage drop? I do not see how but when installing the new solenoid I thought doubt issue but hell let go upset someone by asking a question.

I could check amperage draw with the amprobe. Niow to find out amperage draw?

I know when checked the hot side it had the same as at the delay box and wire going to the solenoid. No real way to check when connected.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: wideopen231,




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Posts: 4279 | Location: Greensboro NC | Registered: May 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
DRR Top Comp
Picture of wideopen231
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One good thing about thread. Most here agree with my thoughts on what was suggested as the problem.

I would think extra voltage would be not a bad thing, within reason. I know with my air compressor on the job site too much drop cord will make it lug on start up because of the restriction of wire size and Lentgh will not allow enough juice to run it properly. Seems to low of voltage would make it struggle to pull magnet in.




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Posts: 4279 | Location: Greensboro NC | Registered: May 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post



DRR Trophy
Picture of Wildman
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I think is what you would find is the solenoid that is faulty will have the windings shorted to ground. This is a very simple circuit. Has there been more than one solenoid fail ? Did you compare the resistance between the new and old solenoid's?
 
Posts: 111 | Location: at a dragstrip near you | Registered: April 02, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of wideopen231
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Only one. Old is junk and not sure what I would find and if it meant anything in indicating a cause other than broke.LOL




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Posts: 4279 | Location: Greensboro NC | Registered: May 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
DRR Elite
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Can we agree you won’t get less than 16v with a relay?


Foxtrot Juliet Bravo
 
Posts: 6426 | Location: Illinois | Registered: July 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
DRR Elite
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Lots of folks running 16V. Are TB relays a common problem being dealt with? Or is this a one off issue?


Foxtrot Juliet Bravo
 
Posts: 6426 | Location: Illinois | Registered: July 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
DRR Top Comp
Picture of wideopen231
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fti said they had seen quite a few solenoids burnt up wit 16v. look up site and click on solenoid say 12 to 20v.




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Posts: 4279 | Location: Greensboro NC | Registered: May 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
DRR S/Pro
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In a dc circuit the amp draw or such components it totally controlled by the voltage applied and the resistance of the circuit, the ore voltage you apply the more amps it will draw there are a few exceptions but in general it’s a fact. You had a bum solenoid from the getgo and I wouldn’t be buying from same supplier who won’t admit they got a bad batch. The coil in the solenoid is just a long piece of wire and the resistance is fixed. Over twenty years of running 16 volts I have never burnt a solenoid up.
 
Posts: 2593 | Location: at the track | Registered: May 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
DRR Top Comp
Picture of wideopen231
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quote:
Originally posted by green1:
In a dc circuit the amp draw or such components it totally controlled by the voltage applied and the resistance of the circuit, the ore voltage you apply the more amps it will draw there are a few exceptions but in general it’s a fact. You had a bum solenoid from the getgo and I wouldn’t be buying from same supplier who won’t admit they got a bad batch. The coil in the solenoid is just a long piece of wire and the resistance is fixed. Over twenty years of running 16 volts I have never burnt a solenoid up.


You may be dead on. They have said they had an issue with the early model and had them built to their specification now. As for bad from the start now that you mention it. It had never acted 100% correct.I always figured something I had wrong or more focused on something else at time.

Either way new worked fine.$150 issue not really much inn big picture,




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Posts: 4279 | Location: Greensboro NC | Registered: May 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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