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I find myself in a unique position with this week’s Blog. Well, maybe not all that unique as I think anyone who writes, sometimes find themselves with what’s termed as “writer’s block.” It’s a condition where for a short time your mind sort of goes blank. It happens and you roll around wondering what in the heck am I going to write about.

As most of you are probably aware, my writings usually center around the sport we all have a passion for. Of course, my absence at certain races this past year sometimes leads me back to that “what in the heck am I going to write about.” I really can’t make excuses for not being at the races as I believe most know I have some other important (read as health) issues to contend with, issues they tell me are only temporary, but still I have to cope with. Anyway, enough of that, here goes something that really is on my mind this week.

It was several years ago when an engine builder friend thought he heard something funny inside his engine. He proceeded to disassemble the entire engine, eventually finding nothing wrong. But his “early detection” may have saved him from a larger problem. The fact that nothing was wrong wasn’t the point.

Two years ago, my Super Stock engine only had about 50 runs on it at the end of the season. Not really looking to take it apart during the off-season, I instead chose to do so anyway. The result after careful examination of the components was a roller lifter wheel starting to go bad. Had I not disassembled it, I could have had real problems the following season. That might not really come under the early detection philosophy because I really hadn’t “detected” anything, but it does prove that early detection of anything is a key.

In order to obtain an NHRA racing license for cars running faster than 9.99, pros or sportsman, it used to require a NHRA-approved medical exam. Several years ago, the NHRA dropped that requirement in certain classes. Their reasoning as I was told was to save the racer some money. But the fact of the matter is that by “forcing” someone to see a doctor could possibly perform the same early detection of a health issue before it turns into something worse. I know of several racers who during that exam, their doctor found the beginnings of what could have turned ugly had it not been detected early. The fact of saving a racer money is a moot point as I believe most racers have some sort of health insurance which usually will pay for well visits. And if you did have to pay for a doctor’s visit, it still would be money well spent. Better spent there than anything you might buy for your race car.

Over the weekend, the National Football League once again rolled out their Crucial Catch directive. I know a lot of people may have opted to not watch NFL games for a variety of reasons and I’m certainly okay with your choices, but their Crucial Catch campaign does bring up a point. According to them, during the height of the pandemic, screenings for cancer dropped radically. Maybe it was the fear of Covid which may have kept people away from doctors and hospitals, but if something doesn’t feel right, you should act on it.

What was that campaign? “If you see something, say something,” which was related to raising public awareness of terrorism. Well, sort of the same goes for “if something doesn’t feel right, do something about it.” It may not turn out to be anything if you’re lucky, but it just as well may. Over and out!
 
Posts: 154 | Location: Beaver Springs, PA | Registered: February 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Worthy topic!
Had I listened to my GP Doc, and / or heeded a couple of warning signs, the outcome of my rectal cancer would have been MUCH different.
Had I not gotten to a doctor, and refused to be put on a wait for treatment by asking about and getting accepted into a clinical trial with the local University Med school, I would have been dead within a few weeks, either from the disease, or my own hand. I was there. I was 48.

By the grace of God, and some very talented, dedicated medical professionals, I'm here living my best life 15 years later.

Guys, if you're 40 plus, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE get checked, family history and what they find during the first exams will determine your course going forward.


"Despite the high cost of living, it remains popular."
Dave Cook
N375
 
Posts: 1698 | Location: Indy | Registered: November 21, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This topic is almost worthy of being a sticky, it's nearly off season, no excuse to not keep your health in order....


"Despite the high cost of living, it remains popular."
Dave Cook
N375
 
Posts: 1698 | Location: Indy | Registered: November 21, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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OK. I'm sold. I get an annual physical with my GP. They analyze both my blood and urine. I was in a 5 year rotation for colonoscopies, but since the last couple were clean, I'm now in a 10 year cycle. Cancer has my full attention. My GP asks questions, listens to my heart and lungs, checks my reflexes, and updates my prescriptions. What else should I, or even could I, be doing?

I plan to pull my engine (the car, not my heart) at the end of this season. The rest of the heap gets normal preventive maintenance. Take care. Tom Worthington


If it seems that bracket racing has gotten too expensive for you, maybe you are just doing it wrong.
 
Posts: 1240 | Location: Rocky Mount, NC | Registered: December 01, 1999Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Had I listened to my doc 10 years ago I would not have lost 5 of the past 9 months to complications and surgery for diverticulitis. Had my first flare up 2011, my GP and surgeon suggested surgery then to correct the issue. Me being a tough guy took the easy (?) way with medications. For the next 9 years all was good or so I thought until last year at this time I began to feel like s-h-i-t. In November the pain was so bad I ended up in the hospital with a sigmoid abscess, diverticulitis related, 10 days in the hospital with 14 days of home health aide visits to get that issue resolved. Surgery was scheduled for 90 days later but due to covid restrictions surgery was suspended. In mid-March it was only getting worse, back in the hospital for 6 days to clear out the infection. My GP and surgeon pulled some strings, surgery took place on April 19. After 8.5 hours of surgery I woke up up to the best news one could get under the circumstances ( feared the worst). Colon resection was successful, no stoma needed, no cancer but now short 11.5" of colon. Its taken 5 months to fully recover, the doc's said 6/8 months. Moral of the story, LISTEN TO YOUR DOCTOR and your body which I should have done 10 years ago. Had I not been such a tough guy (?) I could have avoided the K-R-A-P of the past 11 months. My.02.
 
Posts: 700 | Location: At the beach | Registered: August 05, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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And this is treatment week 3. Chemo sucks. I have more to go and then radiation with chemo most likely followed by surgery. I'm 44 year old fighting to beat stage 4 rectal cancer. I staged 4 as I had 2 very small spots show on my liver. No family history. No medical reasons why but here I am wondering what's in store. My son is 15. My wife and I celebrate 20 years in a few weeks. How many more do I get? How do I protect them financially because this **** isn't cheap. The mental stress outweighs the physical pain. Think you're too manly to take the scope? It's the most painless procedure you will ever have. Go get it done.
 
Posts: 2399 | Location: Ohio | Registered: April 01, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Some might remember Tommy Johnson SR, father of TJ Jr nitro FC driver. Sr was diagnosed with absolute terminal cancer in August of 99, intestinal. He was told to go home, put your affairs in order, you won't see Christmas. He started doing internet research on alternative cancer treatments. The short version is he "beat" cancer. I bought several of his books and gave them to people over the years, then, the un thinkable happened. My wife was diagnosed with stage 3C ovarian cancer and given less than two years to live. We used Tommys book and I am convinced it was responsible, at least in someways for the fact she survived 5.5 years. The book is out of print, maybe resourceful people can find copies on flea bay, or other sites.


Foot brake racers think "outside the box"

 
Posts: 1742 | Location: Pompano Beach, FL | Registered: June 08, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Had my 5 year colonoscopy last month. If you haven't had one and are of age, or have family history that makes it a smart move, do it. It's really not a big deal. You poop for half a day, drinking enough fluids that you're not really hungry, take a good nap while they do the scope, and it's done. 2 polyps, both benign, keep an eye on the diet so that the diverticulosis doesn't turn into diverticulitis.

Shawn is continuing to fight.
Dec 9:
My scans last week were not 100% what we wanted. With bad news there is always positive. No new signs of cancer in the colon/rectal area. Liver tumors are just slightly enlarged but nothing new and we are talking 0.5 cm increase over 3 months and limited chemo so that is a positive. The negative is my cancer has spread into my abdomen. I am going Thursday to have a tumor removed from abdominal wall on my right side. This thing has been horribly painful. I can't sit up, haven't been able to lay down in bed and have been sleeping in my recliner. The plan is to get this thing out so I can begin to function again and feel comfortable enough to go places for extended periods. I will get a few weeks to heal but then we are stepping up the chemo to get this crap under control. It will be April most likely that I will get scans again and if we get it under control with the chemo then we can cut what's left out. Not the way we wanted to spend the Christmas Holiday this year but I'm thankful to be here to celebrate with my family.

Dec 13:
Heading into surgery tomorrow. I want to do something a little different. I am not going to ask for positive vibes, prayers or thoughts because I know they are there. What I would like is for everyone to take a few minutes out of their day to hit up the Get-Go, SpeedWay, Circle K, 7/11 or a local store and grab yourself a frozen coke. Take that little bit of time for you tomorrow. Life is too short not to stop and enjoy the little things.

Dec 15:
I survived surgery yesterday. Was a little more to take out then originally planned. The amount of relief I have right now is incredible and only on Tylenol. I have a drain tube for a few days most likely but otherwise all is good today.

Made it home today. Have a drain tube to tolerate until my follow up but I'll take it if it helps. No pain meds so far. This hurts way less than the mass they took out of my abdomen.

Dec 19:
So we had a set back. Sunday evening I got really sick. Monday the doctor decided to get me back into the hospital. Working on feeling better. I have never been that sick. Good news is no infection. Bad news is I dislike chicken broth but the Italian Icee is a great breakfast.

Dec 21:
Well it was determined there is a blockage in the small intestine area. It could be from surgery or it is from the cancer that spread to my abdomen. We are trying medicine 1st to see if it will clear. Surgery is last option as it would delay getting back to chemo. With this I have a tube down my nose to my stomach to help keep pressure of my belly. I am no food and liquids are IV at this point. Never wanted to **** so bad and be able to celebrate it with everyone I know.

Christmas Eve:
A Christmas of 1st this year. It will be the 1st year without dad. It will be the 1st time I won't be with my family at home. It's my 1st time ever having to stay for long term care at the hospital. It's the 1st time I won't be there for mom since dad passed. It's the 1st time I am really starting to question things but I will still hold that we are never given more than we can handle. I know this is a temporary set back and we will find our way thru all these new 1st.


'81 Cutlass, KX05, Keystone Raceway Park
Millerstown Pic-A-Part, Tarentum, PA
Wholesale Transmission, New Kensington, PA
Thinking of Nikki and Mark - forever 53
 
Posts: 7228 | Location: Pittsburgh | Registered: December 07, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Updates on Shawn:
New Year's Eve - Day whatever it is and still in the hospital. Got bumped from surgery Friday and Saturday due to emergencies that came in. Trying to keep it together but it has been a very long, painful few months. My wife has been a trooper and I honestly don't know what I would do without her. She has let me vent and she has just been the glue holding all this together. I don't know what's to come. Things are still in the air and really just trying to be a good patient to let the doctors do their thing to get me relief. With hopes, 2024 is going to start out right for us. We will get some answers and find the relief we need to be able to get back to eating solid foods and back to my chemo treatments.

Jan 4 - Today is the day. Off to surgery to get rid of this blockage. Need all the prayers and positive vibes that this works to get me the relief I need to be able to eat and get back to my chemo.

Jan 5 - Unfortunately surgery could not happen. The blockage is high and in an area that I have some tumors that we will need to deal with using chemo. Surgery could have created additional complications and really set me back from chemo. To be very transparent at this point, I worked very hard to stay ahead of this disease but it has caught up to me. What that means is we get back to chemo in the upcoming weeks and start to put distance between the cancer and me again. There will be some life changes for me with diet, socialization and just overall life routines. We will fight hard to make this as temporary as possible but it will ultimately come down to how my body will work with the chemo to fight the cancer.

Jan 9 - Well got a day pass to go home today. Now waiting to be admitted again as the sickness has resurfaced. I don't believe I have ever thrown up this much.


'81 Cutlass, KX05, Keystone Raceway Park
Millerstown Pic-A-Part, Tarentum, PA
Wholesale Transmission, New Kensington, PA
Thinking of Nikki and Mark - forever 53
 
Posts: 7228 | Location: Pittsburgh | Registered: December 07, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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ChuckT,

I can't believe I've missed this, what can I say & it sounds like you really don't want much said. I've been through many trials & tribulations very similar. Sounds like you have a positive outlook on the situation. I wish you the very best & keep pushing forward. If there's anything I can do to help, I'm there for you. My thoughts are with you & your family.

2BKING


1980 Camaro
Taking the Best Working Small Tire Shyt Box & making it Greater Than Before!
3000 lbs.
Pump Gas 436
 
Posts: 2601 | Location: NV. | Registered: October 20, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks Brian, but I'm all good. The updates are on Shawn Pinkerton's fight, a few posts up, a really good dude.


'81 Cutlass, KX05, Keystone Raceway Park
Millerstown Pic-A-Part, Tarentum, PA
Wholesale Transmission, New Kensington, PA
Thinking of Nikki and Mark - forever 53
 
Posts: 7228 | Location: Pittsburgh | Registered: December 07, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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That's good, sorry to hear about Shawn. I misconstrued what was going on, it's unfortunate that anyone has to go through this.

2BKING


1980 Camaro
Taking the Best Working Small Tire Shyt Box & making it Greater Than Before!
3000 lbs.
Pump Gas 436
 
Posts: 2601 | Location: NV. | Registered: October 20, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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